Pint-sized Patriots

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 Every day during the summer months, for the past two years, it's been a team of Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts who have raised and lowered the American flag at the more than 10 parks in the city of Garden Grove.

On Sept. 11, the Scouts were presented awards for their service to the community.

 Every day during the summer months, for the past two years, it's been a team of Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts who have raised and lowered the American flag at the more than 10 parks in the city of Garden Grove.

On Sept. 11, the Scouts were presented awards for their service to the community.

Because the awards were given on Sept. 11, Pastor James Scheller, with Faith Community Church in Garden Grove, acknowledged that it has been 12 years since the tragic day where America was attacked by terrorists.

“We want to remember the people who gave their lives that day and at other times,” said Scheller, as he asked for a moment of silence. “Thank you Lord, for this nation of freedom you have given us; keep your hand safely on these Scouts and we cannot forget friends and loved ones who were lost that tragic day. Thank you for our nation that is free. Thank you for these beautiful United States.”

“There's a very specific way to handle the flag,” said Girl Scout Jocelyn Ha with Troop 997. “Above all, treat the flag with respect – raising the flag means we are putting up our nation's symbol.”

Nicholas, 12, from Boy Scout Troop 147, who has been in Cub Scouts for four years and this past year graduated into Boy Scouts, said it was an honor to raise the flag at the parks.

“I get to do my duty to God and show respect to the United States,” he said.

Alex, 8 with Pack 270, said he was able to do everything with regard to raising the flag, at least once throughout the summer, which included unfolding the flag, folding the flag, audience attention narrator and/or caller, raising the flag and lowering the flag and securing the halyard (the rope that raises and lowers the flag).

Color Guard Awards were presented to 10 Boy, Girl and Cub Scout groups during the evening.

Jeremy Broadwater, with the Community Services Department Garden Grove Park Patrol, said their job is to protect people who visit the city's parks.

“Safety is very important to me,” said Broadwater. “I was working at Disneyland in their electrical department when we saw the terrorists’ attack our country. I want to share how fantastic our kids really are in paying respect to our country.”  

“It's tremendously exciting to see this program for a second year,” said Mayor Bruce Broadwater. “I want to thank all of the scouts for keeping the flag high and improving our city. I'm thankful for my Scout training as a young person that I used in the service overseas.”

“What more appropriate group to honor on this day, than the Scouts,” said Councilman Kris Beard. “I was a Scout and all of my three sons are Eagle Scouts. Those are life-long memories. Let us never forget this day and always pay our respects.”

“When I was 8, I had just come to this country from Vietnam, so I didn't have a chance to be in Ccouting,” said Councilman Christopher Phan. “I'm getting married in November and I want my children to be in Scouting. How you honor the flag affects me deeply. As an immigrant, the flag is a symbol of what we believe in; I'm humbled and honored to be with you tonight.”

Guest speaker U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Terry Banning spoke about patriotic service.

“On that day of attack in 2001, we saw a lot of heartache immediately following the attack and we suffered; however, in those same immediate moments, we saw and felt a different force. We witnessed a coming together of our great nation; people risking their lives to lend a helping hand to a fellow American. Thanks to these young people in Scouting, I can say for the first time since coming home, that I have felt that exact feeling of patriotism and honor I felt back then.”

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