Are critics of water park all wet?

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BY TONY CHEONG: One of the biggest developments — and potential tourist destinations — is set to open onHarbor Boulevard in Garden Grove in early 2016.

The 100,000-square-foot, indoor Great Wolf Lodge promises to be the most unique water park in Orange County, featuring 10 water slides and five pools.

But I'm getting mail from critics.

Their complaint: During the biggest drought in California history, how can Garden Grove leaders  justify opening a water park?

BY TONY CHEONG: One of the biggest developments — and potential tourist destinations — is set to open onHarbor Boulevard in Garden Grove in early 2016.

The 100,000-square-foot, indoor Great Wolf Lodge promises to be the most unique water park in Orange County, featuring 10 water slides and five pools.

But I'm getting mail from critics.

Their complaint: During the biggest drought in California history, how can Garden Grove leaders  justify opening a water park?

They've got a point. I mean, Garden Grove residents are being mandated to cut THEIR water usage by about 30 percent.

But they should look at the big picture, and take some facts into consideration.

The big picture: the park, and a 603-room hotel, could bring loads of sorely-needed money into city coffers during tight financial times. For years, Garden Grove has tried to piggyback on the success of Disneyland on Harbor Boulevard. The Great Wolf Lodge might finally do the trick.

The facts: Yes, it will take about 150,000 gallons of water to get the park started, but 98 percent of that water will be reused. The Great Wolf Lodge has a state-of-the-art recycling system whereby it cleans its water and puts it back into circulation.

The recycling system will use a series of mechanized pumps, filters and tanks to purify the water before it is circulated back into the park, said Susie Storey, spokeswoman for the resort company. It is used in the other 12 Great Wolf Lodges.

With 2 percent water loss a day, mostly because of evaporation,  about 3,000 gallons of water will need to be replaced each day.

To put that in perspective, an average family uses about 500 gallons of water a day, conservatively speaking. So 3,000 gallons for a water park is, well, pretty good.

Or am I all wet on this issue? Let me know. I can take it.

Do you have a comment, question or news tip for Tony? Email her at tonyontown@yahoo.com.